As threats from Germany and a European war became more and more apparent, opinions changed. Chamberlain was awarded for his role as one of the “Men of Munich” in books such as The Guilty Men of 1940. A rare defence of the agreement during the war came in 1944 from Viscount Maugham, who had been Lord Chancellor. Maugham regarded the decision to establish a Czechoslovak state with large German and Hungarian minorities as a “dangerous experiment” in light of previous disputes and attributed the agreement largely to the need for France to free itself from its treaty obligations, given that it was not prepared for war. [63] After the war, Churchill`s memoirs of that time, The Gathering Storm (1948), claimed that Chamberlain`s appeasement had been false in Munich, and they recorded Churchill`s pre-war warnings of Hitler`s plan of attack and the madness that Britain insisted on disarmament after Germany had achieved air parity with Britain. While acknowledging that Chamberlain was acting for noble motives, Churchill argued that Hitler should have resisted in Czechoslovakia and that efforts should have been made to involve the Soviet Union. The munich quote in foreign policy debates is also common in the twenty-first century. [107] During negotiations on the Iran nuclear deal by Secretary of State John Kerry, a Republican lawmaker from Texas called the negotiations “worse than Munich.” But when it came to dictatorial countries, the outside world was much less known than was known half a century ago. Because the machine of oppression is now perfected, and if used at its full power, little light can pierce. . .

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